Paul McEuen

John A. Newman Professor of Physical Science

Director, LASSP and Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science

418 Physical Sciences Building
Cornell University
Ithaca NY 14853

(607) 255-5193 (office)
(607) 255-6308 (lab)
plm23@cornell.edu
McEuen Group Homepage

B.S. 1985, Engineering Physics, University of Oklahoma. Ph.D., 1991, Applied Physics, Yale University. Post-Doctoral Researcher, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1990-91. Assistant Professor, Physics, University of California, Berkeley, 1992-96. Associate Professor, Physics, University of California, Berkeley, 1996-2000. Professor, Physics, Cornell University, 2001-present. Office of Naval Research Young Investigator, 1992-95. Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellow, 1992-94. Packard Foundation Fellow, 1992-97. National Young Investigator, 1993-98. LBNL Outstanding Performance Award, 1997. Packard Foundation Interdisciplinary Fellow, 1999. Agilent Europhysics Prize, 2001. Fellow, American Physical Society, 2003. Yale Sci. and Eng. Assoc. Award for Basic and Applied Science, 2009. National Academy of Sciences, 2011; Distinguished Graduates Society, University of Oklahoma College of Engineering, 2013.

Research Areas

The science and technology of nanostructures, particularly carbon-based systems such as nanotubes and graphene; novel fabrication techniques at the nanometer scale; scanned probe microscopy of nanostructures; assembly and measurement of chemical and biological nanostructures

Current Research

Our research focuses on the fabrication and study of nanostructures.  We use these structures to span the gap between the macroscopic and molecular worlds, exploring electronics, optics, mechanics, chemistry and biology at the nanoscale. Current research ranges from the use of carbon nanotubes for optoelectronics and mechanics to the use of graphene for atomic-scale origami.

Postdocs
Kin Fai Mak and Shogo Hamada

Graduate Students
Jonathan Alden, Melina Blees, Arthur Barnard, Isaac Storch, Kathryn McGill, Peter Rose and Alejandro Cortese

  • Spotlight

    Maxim Perelstein
    Finding the mechanism responsible for breaking electroweak symmetry is a current focus of Maxim Perelstein, assistant professor of physics. He also investigates topics in theoretical cosmology, particularly theoretical models for dark energy, dark... read more ||

    Spotlight

    Matt Farrar is a graduate student working with Professor Chris Schaffer in the Biomedical Engineering Department to develop novel optical tools for studying neuropathologies of the brain and spinal cord.  “The ability to study the dynamics of... read more

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    Spotlight

    Tarek Anous, a formerundergraduate student, who worked at the Wilson Lab with Professor Rich Galik on instrumentation for the International Linear Collider (ILC). The ILC is a proposed next-generation particle accelerator with a target date of 2015 to begin operation. Tarek helped construct a small detector that uses cosmic rays in order to simulate the real detector that will be used in the ILC. Cosmic rays hit the scintillator (a plastic rod) and produce photons whose signals ... read more ||

    Spotlight

    Dionysios Anninos was recently an undergraduate physics major at Cornell. "The range of possibilities offered at Cornell is overwhelming. One can end up studying the most disparate fields and end up well versed in them. Personally, I tried to exploit this feature to the maximum. I ended up learning a lot of great physics by sampling a large set of physics courses offered at a unique level, as well as exploring economics and mathematics." "Furthermore, through its advanced courses and research opportunities, Cornell offers the student a unique ... read more ||

    Spotlight

    Wui Ip Professor Carl Franck and student Wui Ip (who is at Cornell as part of the NSF's Research Experiences for Undergraduates program) are studying how cells interact and signal each other to form complicated structures. For example, cells communicate when conditions are good, and they exchange growth factors. Franck and Ip are focusing on the question "Why do cells need company to grow?" It is well known that a minimum culture is needed to grow cells. What determines that ... read more ||

    Spotlight

    Peter Wittich is an assistant professor in LEPP. He collaborates with assistant professor Julia Thom's research group. They are part of an international collaboration preparing the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment that will operate at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) scheduled to begin operation in 2007 in Geneva, Switzerland. Professor Wittich explains that "We're trying to understand fundamental questions such as 'What is the nature of space-time?' and 'Where does mass come from?' We do this by smashing protons together and looking at the very small particles that come out ... read more ||

    Spotlight

    Heng Li is a graduate student working with professor Julia Thom's research group at LEPP. The group is part of an international collaboration preparing the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment that will operate at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) scheduled to begin... read more