Paul McEuen

John A. Newman Professor of Physical Science

Director, LASSP and Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science

418 Physical Sciences Building
Cornell University
Ithaca NY 14853

(607) 255-5193 (office)
(607) 255-6308 (lab)
plm23@cornell.edu
McEuen Group Homepage

B.S. 1985, Engineering Physics, University of Oklahoma. Ph.D., 1991, Applied Physics, Yale University. Post-Doctoral Researcher, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1990-91. Assistant Professor, Physics, University of California, Berkeley, 1992-96. Associate Professor, Physics, University of California, Berkeley, 1996-2000. Professor, Physics, Cornell University, 2001-present. Office of Naval Research Young Investigator, 1992-95. Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellow, 1992-94. Packard Foundation Fellow, 1992-97. National Young Investigator, 1993-98. LBNL Outstanding Performance Award, 1997. Packard Foundation Interdisciplinary Fellow, 1999. Agilent Europhysics Prize, 2001. Fellow, American Physical Society, 2003. Yale Sci. and Eng. Assoc. Award for Basic and Applied Science, 2009. National Academy of Sciences, 2011; Distinguished Graduates Society, University of Oklahoma College of Engineering, 2013.

Research Areas

The science and technology of nanostructures, particularly carbon-based systems such as nanotubes and graphene; novel fabrication techniques at the nanometer scale; scanned probe microscopy of nanostructures; assembly and measurement of chemical and biological nanostructures

Current Research

Our research focuses on the fabrication and study of nanostructures.  We use these structures to span the gap between the macroscopic and molecular worlds, exploring electronics, optics, mechanics, chemistry and biology at the nanoscale. Current research ranges from the use of carbon nanotubes for optoelectronics and mechanics to the use of graphene for atomic-scale origami.

Postdocs
Kin Fai Mak and Shogo Hamada

Graduate Students
Jonathan Alden, Melina Blees, Arthur Barnard, Isaac Storch, Kathryn McGill, Peter Rose and Alejandro Cortese

  • Spotlight

    Wui Ip Professor Carl Franck and student Wui Ip (who is at Cornell as part of the NSF's Research Experiences for Undergraduates program) are studying how cells interact and signal each other to form complicated structures. For example, cells communicate when conditions are good, and they exchange growth factors. Franck and Ip are focusing on the question "Why do cells need company to grow?" It is well known that a minimum culture is needed to grow cells. What determines that ... read more