Paul McEuen

John A. Newman Professor of Physical Science

Director, Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science

514A Physical Sciences Building
Cornell University
Ithaca NY 14853

(607) 255-5193 (office)
(607) 255-6308 (lab)
plm23@cornell.edu
McEuen Group Homepage

B.S. 1985, Engineering Physics, University of Oklahoma. Ph.D., 1991, Applied Physics, Yale University. Post-Doctoral Researcher, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1990-91. Assistant Professor, Physics, University of California, Berkeley, 1992-96. Associate Professor, Physics, University of California, Berkeley, 1996-2000. Professor, Physics, Cornell University, 2001-present. Office of Naval Research Young Investigator, 1992-95. Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellow, 1992-94. Packard Foundation Fellow, 1992-97. National Young Investigator, 1993-98. LBNL Outstanding Performance Award, 1997. Packard Foundation Interdisciplinary Fellow, 1999. Agilent Europhysics Prize, 2001. Fellow, American Physical Society, 2003. Yale Sci. and Eng. Assoc. Award for Basic and Applied Science, 2009. National Academy of Sciences, 2011; Debut novel of the year by the International Thriller Writers Association; Distinguished Graduates Society, University of Oklahoma College of Engineering, 2013; American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 2015.

Research Areas

The science and technology of nanostructures, particularly carbon-based systems such as nanotubes and graphene; novel fabrication techniques at the nanometer scale; micro- and nanoscale machines and active matter; assembly and measurement of chemical and biological nanostructures

Current Research

Our research focuses on the fabrication and study of nanostructures.  We use these structures to span the gap between the macroscopic and molecular worlds, exploring electronics, optics, mechanics, chemistry and biology at the nanoscale. Current research ranges from the use of carbon nanotubes for optoelectronics and mechanics to the use of graphene and other 2D materials for atomic-scale origami, active materials, and micro and nanomachines.

Postdocs
Lei Wang, Long Ju, Shogo Hamada, Jonathan Alden, Marcos Guimarães

Graduate Students
Kathryn McGill, Alejandro Cortese, Kyle Dorsey, Michael Reynolds

  • Spotlight

    Peter Wittich is an assistant professor in LEPP. He collaborates with assistant professor Julia Thom's research group. They are part of an international collaboration preparing the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment that will operate at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) scheduled to begin operation in 2007 in Geneva, Switzerland. Professor Wittich explains that "We're trying to understand fundamental questions such as 'What is the nature of space-time?' and 'Where does mass come from?' We do this by smashing protons together and looking at the very small particles that come out ... read more