Henry Tye

Horace White Professor of Physics

461 Physical Sciences Building
Cornell University
Ithaca NY 14853



sht5@cornell.edu
personal website

B.S., 1970, California Institute of Technology. Ph.D., 1974, Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Research Associate, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 1974-77. Research Associate, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, 1977-78. Research Associate, Cornell University, 1978-80. Senior Research Associate, Cornell University, 1980-87. Professor, Physics, Cornell University, 1987-present. Horace White Professor of Physics, Cornell University, 2007 - present. Fellow, American Physical Society.

Research Areas
Particle theory; superstring theory; cosmology; brane world

Current Research
Elementary particle theory and the interface between cosmology and superstring theory. At the moment, the research is mainly focused on how the superstring theory describes nature. Specifically, the focus is on the recent brane world idea. In this picture, the standard model particles (such as the photon, the gluons, the electron and the quarks) live in the 3+1 dimensional brane while gravitons live in the higher dimensional bulk. Inflation takes place when extra branes are present. String theory properties lead to a robust brane inflationary scenario. Cosmic strings are produced towards the end of inflation, when the extra branes collide. Cosmological implications of this scenario are studied. To understand this scenario in the context of the cosmic landscape in string theory, the wavefunction of the universe and its properties are also studied. An inflationary scenario based on this picture is also proposed and studied. 

  • Spotlight

    Wui Ip Professor Carl Franck and student Wui Ip (who is at Cornell as part of the NSF's Research Experiences for Undergraduates program) are studying how cells interact and signal each other to form complicated structures. For example, cells communicate when conditions are good, and they exchange growth factors. Franck and Ip are focusing on the question "Why do cells need company to grow?" It is well known that a minimum culture is needed to grow cells. What determines that ... read more