Veit Elser

Professor of Physics

426 Physical Sciences Building
Cornell University
Ithaca NY 14853

(607) 255-2340

ve10@cornell.edu
Personal page

B.S., 1979, California Institute of Technology. Ph.D., 1984, U.C. Berkeley. Postdoctoral member of Technical Staff, AT&T Bell Laboratories, 1984-86. Member, Technical Staff, AT&T Bell Laboratories, 1986-88. Assistant Professor, Physics, Cornell University, 1988-93. Associate Professor, Physics, Cornell University, 1993-2001. Professor, Physics, Cornell University, 2001-present. Visiting professor, Universitat Tubingen, 1994-95. William L. McMillan Prize, 1988. Alfred P. Sloan Fellow, 1989-92. Presidential Young Investigator, 1989-94. David and Lucille Packard Fellow, 1989-94. Guggenheim Fellow, 1994-95. Alexander von Humboldt Fellow, 1994-95. Erskine Fellow, 2010. Simons Fellow in Theoretical Physics, 2015.

Research Areas

Phase retrieval algorithms, image reconstruction, optimization, protein folding

Current Research

We develop algorithms for reconstructing particles from noisy diffraction patterns. Currently our efforts are directed at data taken with x-ray free electron lasers, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source. We also work closely with the group of Sol Gruner on image reconstruction in the limit of ultra low photon flux. Over the years we have noticed that our algorithms perform very well on some NP-hard problems; these applications have become a second line of research.

Graduate Students
Yi Jiang, Hyung Joo Park, Zhen Wah Tan, Ti-Yen Lan

  • Spotlight

    Professor Michelle Wang

    Professor Michelle Wang leads LASSP's Single Molecule Biophysics Lab, which is unique in its abilities to manipulate "one molecule at a time" and measure the forces on that molecule. One role of the lab is to make biophysical measurements, such as studies of the packing of DNA in the nucleosome and studies of the molecules involved in gene expression and regulation. Another role is to develop instruments for molecular manipulation. "The lab is pioneering a new technique called angular optical ...
    read more