April 2014: Prof. Itai Cohen and Prof. Jane Wang’s Work on Fruit Fly Flight Featured in New York Times

Researchers have been investigating how flies recover when their flight is momentarily disturbed. For Prof. Itai Cohen and Prof. Jane Wang’s group, they’ve discovered a small group of neurons is solving calculus problems, or what for humans are calculus problems. In order to come to this conclusion, the group glued tiny magnets to the flies and use a magnetic pulse to pull them this way or that, yaw or roll. This research, done by Prof. Itai Cohen and Prof. Jane Wang, along with John Guckenheimr, Tsevi Beatus, and Leif Ristroph, has been featured in an article in the New York Times titled “Flies That Do Calculus With Their Wings.”

To read the article featured in the New York Times, click here.

Posted in News | Comments closed

March 2014: Prof. Dan Ralph and Prof. Albert Sievers Named Outstanding Referee of the Physical Review and Physical Review Letters Journals

Prof. Dan Ralph and Prof. Albert Sievers are among 143 Outstanding Referees of the Physical Review and Physical Review Letters journals, as chosen by the journal editors for 2014.

The Outstanding Referee program expresses appreciation for the essential work that anonymous peer reviewers do for the Physical Review Letters journals. Each year a small percentage of their 60,000 active referees are selected and honored with the Outstanding Referee designation. Selections are made based on the number, quality, and timeliness of referee reports as collected in a database over the last 25 years. The program will recognize about 150 referees each year, although larger groups were selected in 2008 and 2009.

To view the full listing of other Outstanding Referees and details on the program, click here.
To view the press release, click here.

 

Posted in News | Comments closed

March 2014: Physics Graduate Program Ranked in Top 10 in U.S. News and World Reports’ 2015 “Best Graduate Schools”

On March 11, US News and World World Report released the 2015 “Best Graduate Schools.” Eight of Cornell’s graduate engineering fields, three computer sciences specialties, and five other science areas were among the top 10, physics ranking at number 7 with a number 6 ranking in the condenses matter specialty.

Each year, US News surveys graduate programs in the areas of engineering, law, business, medicine, and education. Peer assessment in other areas, such as social sciences and humanities, is collected on a rotating basis. For the new rankings, peer surveys were conducted for Ph.D. programs in some of the sciences, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM) fields.

To read more about the article featured in the Cornell Chronicle, click here.
To view the Physics rankings, click here.
To view the Condensed Matter rankings, click here.

Posted in News | Comments closed

February 2014: Robert McGehee and Alexandre Streicher named Yennie Prize Winners

Undergraduates Robert McGehee and Alexandre Streicher were named Yennie Prize winners this month. This award goes to an outstanding senior student majoring in Physics who shows unusual promise for future contributions to physics research, and who intends to earn the doctorate. It is awarded on the basis of accomplishments during the recipient’s undergraduate years at Cornell, such as performance in formal academic courses, excellence in laboratory work and achievements in independent study or research, at Cornell or elsewhere.

The award is to honor Professor Yennie, who was a long-time member of the Cornell Physics faculty. He was internationally known for his work in theoretical physics, especially in quantum electrodynamics. He was also known to his students and colleagues as a wise and dedicated teacher. This prize is endowed in Professor Yennie’s memory by his family and colleagues.

McGehee and Streicher will be giving a presentation that will summarize their impressions of the four years they have spent at Cornell and on research they have done on Monday, March 10 during the Department of Physics Monday Lunch held in 401 Physical Sciences Building

Congratulations, Robert and Alexandre!

Posted in News | Comments closed

January 2014: Prof. Lawrence Gibbons and Prof. David Rubin Will Work on the Cornell Muon g-2 Team

The Muon g-2 experiment includes a partnership with Cornell physicists, Prof. Lawrence Gibbons and Prof. David Rubin, who will help measure the muon’s magnetic momentum to its angular momentum. Last year, the Cornell Muon g-2 team received National Science Foundation approval for its Major Instrument Research proposal for their role. The proposal was strengthened by the gift from Texas Instruments of about $200,000 worth of specialized analog-to-digital converter chips, which will be integrated into a Cornell-designed series of digitizers that can quickly handle large amounts of data as muons to speed through the new accelerator. Cornell will work with five other institutions on this experiment, with the University of Washington leading the experiment.

To read more about the Muon g-2 experiment at Cornell University in the Cornell Chronicle, click here.

Posted in News | Comments closed

January 2014: Prof. Michael Niemack Helps Develop a 30-year Vision for NASA Astrophysics Research

Professor Michael Niemack, along with about 20 other researchers within the US space agency’s astrophysics division, released a ‘wishlist’ of future space missions, looking three decades into the future. Among this ‘wishlist’ are the popular themes such as ‘Are we alone?’, ‘How did we get here?’, and ‘How does our universe work?’. In addition to these themes, the team lays out the technologies needed to answer these questions.The report discusses near-term projects to plans looking out 20 – 30 years from now.

To read more about the long term vision in Nature news blog, click here.
To read more about the Astrophysics Roadmap from NASA, click here.
To read the report on arXiv, click here.

Posted in News | Comments closed

January 2014: Graduate Student, Robin Bjorkquist, Featured in Cornell Chronicle for Co-Coaching FIRST LEGO League

This past Fall, graduate student, Robin Bjorkquist, was asked to co-coach the FIRST LEGO League (FLL). FLL is a worldwide program for kids ages 9 – 14. Each team designs, builds, and programs autonomous LEGO Mindstorms robot to perform tasks on a special playing field. This challenge encourages kids to look out into the world, identify real problems and view themselves as instruments of innovation and change.

Robin’s team, a group of five girls, grades 3 -5, decided to name their team “Robot Masters.” In November, the team attended a regional qualifying tournament at Corning Community College to share their hard work with the tournament judges and show off their robot in action and watch other teams compete.

To read more about the “Robot Masters” and the FIRST LEGO League, click here.

Posted in News | Comments closed

December 2013: Prof. Donald Hartill Elected as an American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow

Prof. Donald Hartill is among eight Cornell scientists to be elected as fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), which is the world’s largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science. Each year, fellows are nominated by their peers because of their efforts to advance science or its applications. Prof. Hartill was nominated for his distinguished contributions to experimental particle physics and accelerator science and technology, and through service on important committees benefiting the larger scientific community.

To read the article featuring Prof. Hartill and seven other Cornell Scientists in The Cornell Chronicle, click here.
To read the article from AAAS announcing the newly elected fellows, click here.

Posted in News | Comments closed
  • News Archives